National Care Standards Review

The Care Inspectorate and Healthcare Improvement Scotland are currently in the process of developing Scotland’s new National Care Standards. The purpose of the National Care Standards are to “help people across Scotland to receive high standards of support and care, which are delivered in a way which reflects their own personal needs and circumstances“.

Scotland’s National Care Standards were introduced in 2001, and are now under review to ensure they are kept up-to-date with the way care is delivered. Click here to download a report that details the progress of the review so far.

“We want to know whether the new Standards are fit for purpose, the extent to which they are directed at supporting improvement in care and support and ultimately, whether they will achieve better personal outcomes for everyone.”
– Care Inspectorate

Click here to download an update on the National Care Standards review from February 2017. 


Informing Care Inspectorate of Committee Changes

Just a reminder for our committee-run member groups – when you are changing your elected office bearers, the Care Inspectorate would like to stress the importance of informing them of any changes in office bearer details. The Care Inspectorate will complete checks as necessary on new office bearers including a chairperson’s references and PVG.

The ‘Change of Relevant Information Form’ can be found within the eforms section of the Care Inspectorate website (login required). You will find the eforms link underneath the Enquiries phone number (top right corner).


Important changes to Care Inspectorate

The new approach to inspection and improvement support is based on outcomes for people using services, underpinned by human rights, with a more tailored approach and closer links between strategic and frontline service inspections. Some changes came into effect on 1 April 2015, some affect all care service types, others affect only some types of service.

Download the Care Inspectorate ‘Excellence in Care’ info on Changes